Are You a Proud Service Veteran

Veterans are people who serve or have served in the military.  Proud veterans also served, but never were able to get the memories, pride and faithfulness out of their system.  I am a proud veteran who served as an Army infantry officer with the elite 82nd Airborne in Viet Nam.  I saw lots of enemy combat up close and personal.  Despite the fact that it was an unpopular war, I believed politicians made war, not soldiers...and, I wanted to serve as a warrior.  Today when I observe a flag being raised, hear the National anthem, or fly with a soldier returning home it always puts a lump in my throat.  Memorial Day unleashes rich memories of honor and country.  I am quick to defend anything related to the art of soldiering and take great gratification in my years of military service.

Service veterans are people who serve or have served on the frontline of delivering products and/or outcomes to customers or colleagues.  They are the people who see service face-to-face.  Proud service veterans take their role or memory very seriously.  They are quick to defend the belief that, even if a customer is sometimes wrong, the job of a service veteran is to make that customer feel right.  Proud service veterans keep a watchful eye out to improve any process, practice or position that adds effort, anxiety or angst to a customer’s experience.  They are eager to go the extra mile, viewing generosity as a cherished part of an opportunity, not a compulsory part of an obligation.  While they feel the frustration and stress of challenging customers, they revere the art of serving and take great pride in their role.

On this Memorial Day holiday, are you a service veteran or a proud service veteran?  When the topic of customers comes up, do you play the blame game or the aim game?  Would your customers feel your obvious joy or would they witness your subtle indifference.  Salute your customers today and proudly march to the beat of great service.
 

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© Chip Bell Group, 2013.  Courtesy of John R. Patterson (www.johnrpatterson.com).  Permission is given to download and distribute this article as long as it contains this copyright notice.  For other short articles visit our blog site at www.taketheirbreathaway.com